Day 4 already on the Blog Tour for the launch of BAD TURN and I’m in New Zealand (virtually, more’s the pity!) with the wonderful Judith Baxter at Growing Younger Each Day. Judith has already reviewed BAD TURN on her other blog site, Books & More Books, but Judith asked me to write an article about the intricate relationships within the family Charlie is tasked to protect.

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Judith Baxter: I had written and scheduled my post for the blog tour in advance as I was going to be away for a few days.  Earlier I had asked Zoë about this, one of my all-time favourite, series and she generously agreed to write something for my post. Here she gives us a hint of how she gets into a book and bit of a background into Charlie Fox’s character and the effects some of the situations in which she finds herself, have on her. So a second post for today.

And a really  big thank you to Zoë for this :

“Dysfunctional (Crime) Family

BAD TURN: Charlie Fox #13

Zoë Sharp

At their heart, the Charlie Fox novels are action-filled crime thrillers. But I hope that’s not all they are. Exploring the effect that the events of the stories have on Charlie herself, as well as on the other characters involved, has always been one of my main interests.

I like to know what makes people tick. How far they can be pushed. And, in the end, what makes them break.

It’s why my bad guys are rarely all bad. Everyone has shades of light and dark about them. After all, if you’re going to make your antagonists think they are really the heroes of their own story, you have to give them some reason to believe it. You don’t have to like them, as a reader, but you have to be thoroughly engaged by them.

Charlie usually arrives as an outsider into an already established group. Often she is seen as unwanted interference. She has to do her best to protect people almost in spite of themselves.

As was the case with BAD TURN.

Read the rest of this article over on Growing Younger Each Day.

Day 3 on the BAD TURN Blog Tour is hosted by the delightful Liz of Liz Loves Books.

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Today takes the form of a review. Here’s Liz’s verdict on BAD TURN:

“Another pacy thriller from Zoë Sharp—there’s been a few feisty yet realistic heroines popping up in books and long may it last but Charlie Fox set the standard and is keeping it high 13 books later.

This was brilliantly addictive, chock full of action without losing coherence of story and with some unpredictable twists and turns along the way.

Charlie Fox is such a great main protagonist, clearly defined and engaging and every book flies by, page turning quality in every one. I love that you are never quite sure where they will end up.

Really excellent thrillers. Recommended.”

Read the full post over on Liz Loves Books.

First stop on the Blog Tour for the brand new Charlie Fox crime thriller, BAD TURN, is Shotsmag Confidential, courtesy of the lovely Ayo Onatade.

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One of the things I’ve always enjoyed about writing the Charlie Fox books is that they are not tied to one location. A part of me can see the attraction of a familiar locale and I know it might be a good idea to do this. After all, tours of Rebus’s Edinburgh, Morse’s Oxford, or Aimée Leduc’s Paris are undoubtedly popular.

But every time I sit down to write the next instalment in this series, deciding where she’s going to be heading off to is one of the things that keeps me hooked. The very nature of Charlie’s job in close protection means she has to be minutely aware of her surroundings. I take it as a challenge to try to weave in as much of the ever-changing dynamic between Charlie and her environment as I can into the fabric of the story.

For BAD TURN, number 13 in the series, I wanted a real European setting. I took Charlie to a bodyguard training school in Germany for one of the early books, HARD KNOCKS, and on a bikers’ fast trip around Ireland in ROAD KILL, but this time out I decided it was high time she made a return to mainland Europe.

I’d driven down to the southern area of France just before starting BAD TURN, and the scarcity of both people and other vehicles once we got away from the cities really set my imagination going. Tailing someone without other traffic to use as cover, for example, would present its own difficulties for Charlie.

Read the rest of this article over on Shotsmag Confidential here.

Read the first three chapters of BAD TURN.

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The brand new Charlie Fox crime thriller, BAD TURN, is due to be published this coming Friday—September 27.

Hard as it is for me to believe it sometimes, this will be book thirteen in the series. They do not get any easier to write.

Mostly, though, I feel that’s the way it should be. If something is worth having, it should be worth struggling for. And I do agonise over the story, the development of the characters and the continuing journey of my main protagonist, Charlie herself. I always try to find a slightly different problem to throw at Charlie, a different means of testing her.

This time, the question I posed at the outset was, having resigned from the executive-protection agency run by Parker Armstrong and been forced to give up her company-subsidised apartment in New York, has she gone over to the dark side by taking on a job for a shady international arms dealer?

Usually, you have the reassurance of your agent and publisher behind you. They are excited by the initial idea, approving of the outline, and then they get to go through the delivered manuscript, line by line, to give you their feedback and advice.

Or not, as the case may be. I’ve delivered books to publishers before now only to be greeted by weeks of silence before the copy-edits turn up with no comment on the work other than corrections to punctuation and spelling.

It can make the approach of publication day something of a nail-biting experience.

This time, however, is different.

 

Read the rest of this blog over on MurderIsEverywhere.

The new Charlie Fox crime thriller, BAD TURN, will be published on September 27 and I’ll be celebrating by taking to the information superhighway on a Blog Tour.

I’ll be talking about the story behind the story, the settings and the characters with either a guest blog or a review every day from pub day, September 27, through to October 06. It should be an interesting ten days. I hope you’ll join me!

Day 1: September 27

Shotsmag Confidential with Ayo Onatade  https://wwwshotsmagcouk.blogspot.com

Day 2: September 28

Anne Bonny Book Reviews with Abby Slater-Fairbrother  https://annebonnybookreviews.com

Day 3: September 29

Liz Loves Books with Liz Barnsley  http://lizlovesbooks.com

Day 4: September 30

Growing Younger Each Day with Judith Baxter  https://growingyoungereachday.wordpress.com

Day 5: October 01

TripFiction with Tina Hartas  https://www.tripfiction.com

Day 6: October 02

By The Letter Book Reviews with Sarah Hardy  https://bytheletterbookreviews.com

Day 7: October 03

Hair Past A Freckle with Karen Cole  https://hairpastafreckle72.blogspot.com

Day 8: October 04

Jen Med’s Book Reviews with Jen Lucas  https://jenmedsbookreviews.com

Day 9: October 05

Chapter In My Life with Sharon Bairden   https://chapterinmylife.wordpress.com

Day 10: October 06

Crime Book Junkie with Noelle Holten  https://crimebookjunkie.co.uk

Make sure you don’t miss the next instalment of Charlie Fox, BAD TURN, which is now available for pre-order. This will be the thirteenth book featuring Charlie Fox in the award-winning crime thriller series.

To secure your copy in ebook format for Amazon at the special pre-order price, visit:

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Amazon AU

Amazon BR

Amazon CA

Amazon DE

Amazon ES

Amazon FR

Amazon IT

Amazon JP

Amazon MX

Amazon NL

add to your Wish List on Amazon IN

Or to pre-order in ePub format:

Nook

Kobo US

Kobo UK

Apple US

Apple UK

Print formats—mass-market paperback, library hardcover, and Large Print—will also be coming soon!

eBook ISBN: 978-1-909344-55-6

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The Bay crime thriller series

A new six-part crime drama series started this week in the UK on ITV. Set in Morecambe and called The Bay, it stars Morven Christie as a Detective Sergeant, Lisa, who is assigned as Family Liaison Officer when fifteen-year-old twins go missing in the seaside town. Her job is to support the family and be on the inside for the police investigators.

As soon as the distraught father, Sean (played by Jonas Armstrong) arrives home, however, she discovers that he’s the bloke with whom she had a quickie while on a girls’ pub crawl the night before. Much complication ensues.

Morven Christie in The Bay

Morven Christie as Detective Sergeant Lisa Armstrong in The Bay (ITV). Photographer: Ben Blackall

Morven Christie’s recent TV credits include Grantchester, Agatha Christie’s Ordeal By Innocence, and The A Word. Jonas Armstrong’s recent outings include Ripper StreetTroy: Fall of a City, and Line of Duty. The work of playwright and screenwriter, Daragh Carville, The Bay has been mooted as ‘Broadchurch in Morecambe’—which I’m ashamed to admit that I haven’t yet got around to watching.

I confess, though, that I do quite like TV dramas where one story is told over a number of instalments. You do seem to get more depth to the characters and, ultimately, more sympathy for the victim—and in some cases for the perpetrator as well.

Of course, I’m equally a fan of TV series made up of standalone stories—more like the way a book series is structured. At least if you miss one, you can still follow what’s happening in the next episode. Although, now we’re in the age of catch-up and box set TV, that’s not as much of a consideration anymore.

To read the rest of this blog, visit Murder Is Everywhere.

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It’s always a great thrill to receive a review on one of my books from a fellow author. This one came in a few days ago from US mystery author, Randy Overbeck. He emailed, opening with the words ‘I finished Fox Hunter and really loved it. Your best yet, I think.’

Here’s Randy’s review:

‘I’ve been a fan of thriller writer Zoë Sharp for years and have read several of her books, enjoying every one, especially the Charlie Fox series. Just to name a few, in First Drop, she took her readers on a dizzying roller coaster ride in the middle of an assassination attempt of a teen Charlie is guarding, and in Road Kill readers get strapped in for an electrifying ride atop a few sleek motorcycles when Charlie infiltrates a biker gang, almost becoming road kill herself in the process.

‘But in Fox Hunter, the latest in the series, Sharp has outdone herself. In this twelfth entry, Charlie Fox is sent on a mission to rescue—or apprehend—her old mentor and lover, Sean Meyer, who may have gone off the reservation and tortured and killed a man from their mutual past. A man Charlie has every reason to be glad is dead.

‘Her search takes her from the scorched landscapes of the Iraqi desert and up to the snowy mountains of Bulgaria. Along the way she encounters a Russian hit squad, an Iraqi teen raped and then disfigured and abandoned by her own family, black market antiquities smugglers and a former client, a major crime boss. One aspect that makes Ms. Sharp’s writing so sterling is her ability to transport the reader vividly to the settings of her narratives, whether it be the sights and smells of Disney World in First Drop or the twisting switchbacks of the Irish countryside in Road Kill.

‘In Fox Hunter, the scenes of the desert are real, I swear I could feel the hot sun and the grit of the sand in my face (and it was in the middle of a freezing January). Of course, my teeth practically chattered when I was riding alongside Charlie atop a snowmobile up the frozen slopes to a mountain fortress.

‘Did I mention that Charlie Fox is one tough broad? There’s a reason why Lee Child calls Charlie Fox a female Jack Reacher.

‘If you’ve not yet had a chance to discover this brilliant British writer, you’ve been missing some really great rides. And Fox Hunter would be a great place to start. But so would First Drop or Die Easy or Hard KnocksYou get the picture. By all means, if you want a thriller with a kick-ass heroine, add Zoë Sharp to your list of must reads.’

Randy’s new novel, Blood On The Chesapeake, book one of the Haunted Shores Mysteries series, will be out on April 10th. It’s available for pre-order on Amazon.com and Amazon UK.

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The needle was the size of the insert of a biro. Just as the nurse was lining it up with the vein in my left arm, I asked him, “So, how long have you been doing this?”

“Oh, since about October,” he replied. “Before that, after I left the army, I was a hairdresser…”

You might have thought this would have made me more nervous but, actually, I’ve found those newer to the profession are always that little bit more careful when stabbing you with sharp objects.

I have been a blood donor since I got my first motorcycle licence back in the 1990s. I decided a bit of pay-it-forwards might not be a bad idea—the road accident statistics being what they were. Fortunately, I’ve never needed to receive blood. But you never know…

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I’m ashamed to admit that my recent donation was the first time I’ve given blood in five years. Personal upheaval and several changes of location were the main culprits. Add to that the fact that you can no longer just go along to a session but need to make an appointment, booked well in advance. As I found from experience, they fill up fast. In fact, by the time I received the invitation from the blood transfusion service, all the appointments were usually long gone.

However, this time I was lucky. They called me and there were two slots left. The experience was quick, not at all painful—you even get a hot drink and biscuits afterwards—and left me with a feeling of satisfaction. I have already been online and booked my next appointment for April. That will be my fiftieth donation.

I did quite a bit of research on blood groups and their combinations when I was writing book six in the Charlie Fox series, SECOND SHOT, mainly to find out which blood groups in parents could—or could not—produce which blood groups in a child.

The most common type is O-positive—38 percent of the population has this type. Those with O-negative are far fewer at only 7 percent. These are the ones known as universal donors—you can give O-negative blood to all other ABO types, in an emergency.

A-positive is the next most common blood group, at 34 percent, all the way down to AB-negative, at just one percent of the population. Those with AB-positive blood (3 percent) are known as universal receivers. The rarest blood type in the world is Rh-null, which can be accepted by anyone in the Rh system. As of 2014, there were fewer than 10 such people in the world donating their blood.

If you are fit and healthy and are not a blood donor, perhaps it’s time to make a New Year’s Resolution to become one in 2019?

This week’s Word of the Week is sanguineous, meaning blood red, involving bloodshed, or bloodthirsty, from sanguis, Latin for blood, it shares its roots with sanguine, which has come to mean confident or optimistic but originally meant to have a ruddy complexion. In medieval times, this was thought to denote a courageous temperament.