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Posts Tagged ‘location’

BAD TURN Blog Tour Day5 – Talking Location with TripFiction

Day 5 of the Blog Tour for BAD TURN and today I’m the guest of the terrific Tina Hartas at TripFiction, recalling my visit to rural New Jersey and why I felt the state made a great location for the opening scenes of the book.

New Jersey may be the sixth smallest state in the US but it certainly punches above its weight when it comes to a reputation for corruption and crime. After all, it was home to Tony Soprano, and while I acknowledge that the Soprano family home on Stag Trail Road was fictional, North Caldwell NJ was not. What better state to locate my own international arms dealer with possible ties to the darker side of the trade?

Before I got out and started exploring, all I had really seen of the place was the inside of Newark Airport, parts of Jersey City, and the train ride under the Hudson to Penn Station. I admit that these areas were probably not really New Jersey’s best side, although the view across the river from Jersey City to Manhattan Island was quite something.

It was a pleasure, therefore, to rent a car and drive out west from Newark into the rural farmland that makes up so much of the state. I passed signs for places that I’m used to seeing at home in the UK—Bedminster, Tewksbury, Bloomsbury and Hampton—just not in that order.

Once I got off the main 78 highway, I found myself on winding roads bordered by woods and fields. The traffic thinned almost to nothing. And my mind, as it tends to do, turned to thoughts of…ambushes.

Read the rest of this post over on TripFiction.

#BlogTour Day9 – “Everything I’m looking for in an action thriller.”

Huge thanks to Karen Cole at Hair Past A Freckle for not only doing a great review, but also for letting me go through some of the genuine locations and settings for the book, with pictures to suit.

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It’s my pleasure to be hosting the blog tour for DANCING ON THE GRAVE by Zoë Sharp today, many thanks to the author and Ayo Onatade for inviting me and for my e-copy of the novel. Zoë has very kindly written a guest post about why she chose to set Dancing On The Grave in the Lake District and included some beautiful photographs which I’ll share after my review.

I loved FOX HUNTER when I read it last year despite not having read any of the other books in Zoë Sharp’s Charlie Fox series and so I was intrigued to read her latest standalone thriller, DANCING ON THE GRAVE. The book opens with a sniper about to take a shot; seconds later his intended victim has been killedbut he didn’t pull the trigger. This quiet corner of England is about to be shattered by a murderous rampage but first Crime Scene Investigator, Grace McColl has been called to examine the scene of what at first appears to be a straightforward case when a German Shepherd Dog is shot after massacring a field of sheep. Farmers are well within their rights to shoot dogs which are worrying their animals but the owner of this flock claims it wasn’t him and the evidence backs him up. Detective Constable Nick Weston is dispatched to the scene of the crimeand as the new face in the office, his colleagues omit to mention that the victim has four legs and a tail. This first meeting between Grace and Nick doesn’t have an auspicious start; she is cool and detached, he is hungover and angry. However, the pair quickly grow to respect one another, they are both outsiders and though he relies on instinct while she prefers physical evidence, they are both determined characters with pasts which mean they have something to prove as others wait for them to slip up.

Read the rest of Karen Cole’s excellent review here. And also my article on the locations behind the book:

A Plot Leads To a Plot—why I chose the Lake District setting for Dancing On The Grave: a standalone crime thriller

I ended up living in the Lake District more by chance than anything else. We’d been looking for land to build our own house, and when a plot came up in Mallerstang, part of the Eden Valley bordering the Yorkshire Dales National Park on the eastern side of the Lakes, I couldn’t believe our luck.

Previously, we’d lived in Kendal and whilst building rented a flat in Appleby-in-Westmorland, so I spent quite a bit of time in the surrounding towns and villages. The more time I spent there, the more I really wanted to set a book in that lesser-known area of the Lakes.

Orton from Orton Scar

Orton Village from higher up Orton Scar, with the white church tower just visible.

After the Washington Sniper attacks took place in the States in 2002, I’d been mulling over the plot involving a similar incident in a rural location in the UK. The wild areas of Orton Scar (which is how it’s known locally—officially it’s the Great Asby Scar National Nature Reserve) and Orton village itself with its distinctive white-towered church, seemed to cry out for dramatisation.

Read the rest of the blog post article after the review here.

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